Seedless Rye Bread; Only 4 Ingredients!

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This bread is a variant of my all-time favorite and so simple muesli bread recipe. I love rye bread for things like sandwiches, toast and dipping in sauce amongst other things but pesky seeds in my bread, which are all too often found in store bought rye breads, are not my cup of tea. So I decided to try making my own seedless, rustic rye loaf. With barely any kneading and letting the dough rest for 2 hours and up to a day in the fridge it is such a simple process that making your own artisan bread needn’t take any extra effort or time out of your day. 24 hours after mixing together the flour, water, salt and yeast Anna and I were enjoying slices of crusty, warm rye bread straight out of the oven (well, after the loaf had cooled just enough to cut) with butter melting into the nooks and crannies for our lunch. This is a no fuss bread that can be ready in as little as 4 1/2 hours or can be left to sit for days in the fridge to slowly ferment and develop a mild sourdough taste. This loaf is at its best right after baking and still warm from the oven but the next day I tore up thick slices of it into pieces and generously covered them in a homemade tomato sauce with Roma beans, which I have to say was equally delicious in its own right. However you want to slice it, you won’t regret the time spent making your own loaf of this bread.

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Seedless Rye Bread

  • 2 cups Rye Flour
  • 1 1/4 cups Bread Flour
  • 1 1/2 cups of warm Water (about 110°F)
  • 1 Tbs or about 1 packet of Yeast
  • 1/2 Tbs Salt

Mix warm water, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add the flour and stir with a large spoon until a sticky ball forms. Remove the dough from the bowl, oil the bowl and return the dough to the oiled bowl (or you can use a second bowl). Cover with a towel and let sit in a warm spot to rise for one and up to two hours. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a lid and let rise in the fridge for 1-2 hours or overnight. Lightly flour a clean surface. Turn the dough out onto the floured surface and knead a few times until it feels smooth. Form into a ball and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and sprinkle the top with a dusting of flour. Roll up two dish towels and place them around the ball so that when it rises it doesn’t spread out too flat. Cover with a clean towel and let rise for at least half an hour. Put a metal baking dish in the oven with about an inch or two of water in it and preheat the oven to 450°F. When the oven is preheated remove the towels and cut two 1/2″ deep slashes in the top of the bread and carefully place in the oven (there will be steam). Bake for 30 minutes or until browned on top and sounds hollow when tapped. Transfer the loaf from the baking sheet to a baking rack and bake for 5 more minutes to brown the bottom of the loaf (I remove the pan of water at this time too, but be careful it’s very hot!). Let the loaf cool on a wire rack for about half an hour before cutting (if you can!). Enjoy warm or you can store the bread for up to 4-5 days and it is equally delicious toasted.

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Rhubarb Revisited

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I love rhubarb. It is one of my all-time favorites for pies, crumbles, tarts, compotes etc. Right now in Germany it has become readily available at the markets again. Yea! I know there is a brief window for fresh rhubarb in the spring and from what I’ve experienced here it is virtually impossible to get it at any other time of the year, so I take advantage of getting some of it whenever I can. I am abstaining from all sweets and processed sugars until the beginning of Easter but I do make an exception on Sundays and allow myself one indulgence (which had always been the tradition in my family as I was growing up and as I typically gave up ice cream and/or television as a kid during Lent it was tough to make it to Sunday!). This Sunday I plan to use the several stalks of rhubarb that are waiting for me in the kitchen to make myself a tasty crisp.

Rhubarb Crisp

For the Filling

  • 6-8 Stalks of Rhubarb

  • 1/4 cup Orange Juice

  • 1/3 cup Muscovado Sugar (Natural Cane Sugar), Turbinado or Brown Sugar

  • 1 Egg

  • 2 Tbs Corn Starch

  • 2 Tbs Vanilla Extract, 1 packet of Dr. Oetker’s Bourbon Vanilla Extract
    or the seeds from 1 Vanilla Bean

  • 1 tsp Cinnamon (optional)

For the Crumble Topping

  • 1 cup all purpose Flour

  • 2 Tbs ground Flax Seed

  • 1/4 cup Muscovado Sugar (Natural Cane Sugar) or Brown Sugar

  • 1 stick (about 113 grams) cold Butter

Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Clean and cut the rhubarb into 1/4-1/2 inch pieces and put into a large bowl. In a small bowl combine the sugar and starch until well combined. Toss the rhubarb with the sugar mixture until well coated. Beat the egg and add the orange juice and vanilla extract and mix well with the rhubarb until everything is coated. Transfer the rhubarb to a pie plate or large tart pan. In another large bowl prepare the crumble topping by mixing the flour with the ground flax seed and the sugar. Cut the butter into tablespoon sized pieces and add to the flour mixture. With a pastry cutter, two knives or a food processor cut the butter into the flour until pieces no larger than the size of large peas remain. Layer the crumble topping evenly over the rhubarb but do not press down. Bake for 50-60 minutes or until the filling is bubbling and the top is browned.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Cutting the Butter

Rhubarb crisp

Crumble Topping

Out of the oven

Enjoy!

 

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